sherlockology:

If you weren’t able to see Martin Freeman and Amanda Abbington being bamboozled by Derren Brown on Channel 4’s Stand Up to Cancer telethon last night, you can watch the full thing above!

18 octobre 2014 ♥ 1 103 notes           Reblog    
reblogged from sherlockology
bakerstreetbabes:


The Yellow Face: Effie Munro and Her Daughter Lucy Hebron
By BSB Amy

                “The Yellow Face,” along with several other canonical Holmes stories, presents unavoidable difficulties for modern readers. In fact, at a recent convention, my fellow panelist suggested that this story should never even be printed. Before I get into the specifics of why Effie Munro and her daughter are some of the most inspiring women in the Holmes canon, I’d like to respectfully address why I disagree with this push for censorship.
                First, it’s abundantly clear that the story is not politically correct by current standards. It contains problematic terminology and racial characterizations. However, these uncomfortable inclusions accurately reflect a time and place that, as much as they might disturb our sensibilities, did exist at one time.  When Warner Brothers shows racially-charged vintage cartoons, they famously include a disclaimer to the effect that while they do not espouse the views of the cartoons, they believe it is harmful to ignore the prejudices that used to exist. As the ubiquitous quote tells us, if we choose to forget history, we’re doomed to repeat it. Stories like “The Yellow Face” remind us of how far we’ve come, but they also remind us of how far we still have to go when it comes to tolerance and respect for human differences.
                Second, I am forever willing to defend “The Yellow Face,” because, in spite of being a man of his time in his use of terms and stereotypes, Doyle’s actual plotting of the story is a rallying cry for acceptance and love that were so far ahead of his time that it boggles the mind. It would be a truly ironic pity for a story that thumbs its nose at the ingrained injustice of the past to be lost to history because we can’t see the forest of positives for the problematic trees. That said, I’ll move onto the treasure trove of the story itself.

Original art by Marcia Dye: link to her blog and Etsy Shop
“The Yellow Face” begins in a grim way, with a likable man named Grant Munro seeking Holmes’s help to unravel the mystery of why his loving wife, Effie, has suddenly become secretive and given to lying and night-time rendezvous. Munro’s story itself reflects Doyle’s progressiveness. The man does not abuse, restrict, or otherwise belittle his obviously-troubled wife. He’s justifiably concerned by her behavior, but he does not resort to overbearing behavior to get the answer he seeks. He treats her as an equal, which she obviously is.
Effie’s behavior appears alarmingly erratic both to the reader and to Holmes, who immediately concocts an explanation for her actions that includes blackmail by her former, supposedly-deceased husband. Things don’t look very good for Grant, and they appear even worse for his wife.

That’s when one of the most dramatic reversals in the entire canon occurs. A late-night confrontation by Holmes, Watson, and Munro finds none of the sordid details the detective supposed to be true. Instead, Effie is revealed to be the courageous mother of a secret child, desperate to be faithful to her little girl and to her husband. The reason for her secrecy is simple: Her first marriage was interracial, and her child is a reflection of that union. She, like the Victorian reader would have done, assumes that her husband shares the prejudices of his time and will not accept the fact that she is a widow of an interracial marriage or ever be able to love a child who looks so very different from the Victorian ideal.
                Effie, while admirably brave and indefatigably strong, is absolutely wrong. Grant Munro tenderly embraces his wife and her child, and the reader is left with the assurance that a new life, as a family, is ahead for the three of them.  Now that we’ve looked at the story itself, I’ll move on to the themes that make Effie and her daughter such amazing women.

“The Yellow Face” is a remarkably feminist story, in addition to its progressive racial themes. It’s impossible to argue that Doyle wrote it to glorify Holmes’s skills, since the detective reads the situation entirely incorrectly and admits as much at the very end. It’s also not one that presents a wildly action-packed plot or complicated mystery. It’s extremely straightforward in both plot and message. Doyle very obviously wanted to make the statements he made, and he made them very clearly indeed. Let’s unpack some of these specifically feminist statements as embodied in the characters of Effie and Lucy.
First, when Grant Munro approaches Holmes, he presents a picture of his wife that reflects an intelligent, multi-dimensional woman who takes control of her own life and responsibilities. Of Effie, one of his first statements is, “She went out to America when she was young, and lived in the town of Atlanta, where she married.” There is no mention here of family connections or obligations. The reader is left to speculate about Effie’s reasons for going to America, but it’s clear that she’s a woman who is ready for adventure and who adapts to her surroundings. Continuing, Grant tells Holmes and Watson that after a yellow fever outbreak claimed the lives of her husband and (he believes) her child, she returned to England and settled on her own with the comfortable living her husband had left behind. Again, we are shown a woman who is not afraid to take the reins of her own life and who is far from desperate to land a man. Her subsequent marriage to Munro is presented as an entirely love-based union, devoid of any damsel-in-distress connotations. In fact, she enters the marriage as the financially-superior partner. As Effie’s portrait is first unveiled to us, we are shown, in no uncertain terms, that she is self-actualized, courageous, and mature.

Original art by Marcia Dye
Second, as the story unfolds, Effie’s actions prove her strength. Though her behavior seems underhanded at first, in the context of her situation, it becomes far more admirable. It’s not until the end of the story that we discover the truth of her interracial marriage, itself an almost unimaginably brave choice in the context of the American South of her time. Not only does she enter the union, but she also mothers a child of whom she is extremely proud. Her later secrecy has nothing to do with shame about her late husband or beloved child; it’s a protective gesture, designed to shelter herself and her daughter from her current husband’s rejection. She’s a fierce mother, willing to risk a huge amount to care for a child that many people of her time would have refused to acknowledge. Effie’s one miscalculation is in her assessment of Grant, who proves to be far more tolerant and admirable than she believed. Like him, the reader can forgive this one thing because her motives are so obviously honorable and extremely understandable.
“The Yellow Face,” despite its issues, presents a woman who is smart, brave, decisive, and loyal, unwilling to reject her child in favor of a comfortable life free of others’ judgments. Even though she initially fails to realize the extent of Grant’s goodness, she is obviously also wise when it comes to her romantic choices, selecting two men to share her life who are honorable and kind beyond the limits of their time. As the child of such a mother, it’s hard to imagine Lucy growing up to be anything other than exceptional.

                Some may see “The Yellow Face” as the relic of an age best forgotten, but I don’t believe Effie Munro or Lucy Hebron would approve. Sometimes, as readers, we open the pages of history and wade through context and bygone mores to find the diamonds hidden in plain sight among the things that we’d rather not remember.
                Effie and her daughter are the creations of a man who operated within the confines of his time and society but also used his pen to joyfully and explosively break those confines wide open to present two women who deserve to be known and understood for years to come. May they never be forgotten in favor of stories we find easier to read.
               

bakerstreetbabes:

The Yellow Face: Effie Munro and Her Daughter Lucy Hebron

By BSB Amy

                “The Yellow Face,” along with several other canonical Holmes stories, presents unavoidable difficulties for modern readers. In fact, at a recent convention, my fellow panelist suggested that this story should never even be printed. Before I get into the specifics of why Effie Munro and her daughter are some of the most inspiring women in the Holmes canon, I’d like to respectfully address why I disagree with this push for censorship.

                First, it’s abundantly clear that the story is not politically correct by current standards. It contains problematic terminology and racial characterizations. However, these uncomfortable inclusions accurately reflect a time and place that, as much as they might disturb our sensibilities, did exist at one time.  When Warner Brothers shows racially-charged vintage cartoons, they famously include a disclaimer to the effect that while they do not espouse the views of the cartoons, they believe it is harmful to ignore the prejudices that used to exist. As the ubiquitous quote tells us, if we choose to forget history, we’re doomed to repeat it. Stories like “The Yellow Face” remind us of how far we’ve come, but they also remind us of how far we still have to go when it comes to tolerance and respect for human differences.

                Second, I am forever willing to defend “The Yellow Face,” because, in spite of being a man of his time in his use of terms and stereotypes, Doyle’s actual plotting of the story is a rallying cry for acceptance and love that were so far ahead of his time that it boggles the mind. It would be a truly ironic pity for a story that thumbs its nose at the ingrained injustice of the past to be lost to history because we can’t see the forest of positives for the problematic trees. That said, I’ll move onto the treasure trove of the story itself.

Original art by Marcia Dye: link to her blog and Etsy Shop

“The Yellow Face” begins in a grim way, with a likable man named Grant Munro seeking Holmes’s help to unravel the mystery of why his loving wife, Effie, has suddenly become secretive and given to lying and night-time rendezvous. Munro’s story itself reflects Doyle’s progressiveness. The man does not abuse, restrict, or otherwise belittle his obviously-troubled wife. He’s justifiably concerned by her behavior, but he does not resort to overbearing behavior to get the answer he seeks. He treats her as an equal, which she obviously is.

Effie’s behavior appears alarmingly erratic both to the reader and to Holmes, who immediately concocts an explanation for her actions that includes blackmail by her former, supposedly-deceased husband. Things don’t look very good for Grant, and they appear even worse for his wife.

That’s when one of the most dramatic reversals in the entire canon occurs. A late-night confrontation by Holmes, Watson, and Munro finds none of the sordid details the detective supposed to be true. Instead, Effie is revealed to be the courageous mother of a secret child, desperate to be faithful to her little girl and to her husband. The reason for her secrecy is simple: Her first marriage was interracial, and her child is a reflection of that union. She, like the Victorian reader would have done, assumes that her husband shares the prejudices of his time and will not accept the fact that she is a widow of an interracial marriage or ever be able to love a child who looks so very different from the Victorian ideal.

                Effie, while admirably brave and indefatigably strong, is absolutely wrong. Grant Munro tenderly embraces his wife and her child, and the reader is left with the assurance that a new life, as a family, is ahead for the three of them.  Now that we’ve looked at the story itself, I’ll move on to the themes that make Effie and her daughter such amazing women.

“The Yellow Face” is a remarkably feminist story, in addition to its progressive racial themes. It’s impossible to argue that Doyle wrote it to glorify Holmes’s skills, since the detective reads the situation entirely incorrectly and admits as much at the very end. It’s also not one that presents a wildly action-packed plot or complicated mystery. It’s extremely straightforward in both plot and message. Doyle very obviously wanted to make the statements he made, and he made them very clearly indeed. Let’s unpack some of these specifically feminist statements as embodied in the characters of Effie and Lucy.

First, when Grant Munro approaches Holmes, he presents a picture of his wife that reflects an intelligent, multi-dimensional woman who takes control of her own life and responsibilities. Of Effie, one of his first statements is, “She went out to America when she was young, and lived in the town of Atlanta, where she married.” There is no mention here of family connections or obligations. The reader is left to speculate about Effie’s reasons for going to America, but it’s clear that she’s a woman who is ready for adventure and who adapts to her surroundings. Continuing, Grant tells Holmes and Watson that after a yellow fever outbreak claimed the lives of her husband and (he believes) her child, she returned to England and settled on her own with the comfortable living her husband had left behind. Again, we are shown a woman who is not afraid to take the reins of her own life and who is far from desperate to land a man. Her subsequent marriage to Munro is presented as an entirely love-based union, devoid of any damsel-in-distress connotations. In fact, she enters the marriage as the financially-superior partner. As Effie’s portrait is first unveiled to us, we are shown, in no uncertain terms, that she is self-actualized, courageous, and mature.

Original art by Marcia Dye

Second, as the story unfolds, Effie’s actions prove her strength. Though her behavior seems underhanded at first, in the context of her situation, it becomes far more admirable. It’s not until the end of the story that we discover the truth of her interracial marriage, itself an almost unimaginably brave choice in the context of the American South of her time. Not only does she enter the union, but she also mothers a child of whom she is extremely proud. Her later secrecy has nothing to do with shame about her late husband or beloved child; it’s a protective gesture, designed to shelter herself and her daughter from her current husband’s rejection. She’s a fierce mother, willing to risk a huge amount to care for a child that many people of her time would have refused to acknowledge. Effie’s one miscalculation is in her assessment of Grant, who proves to be far more tolerant and admirable than she believed. Like him, the reader can forgive this one thing because her motives are so obviously honorable and extremely understandable.

“The Yellow Face,” despite its issues, presents a woman who is smart, brave, decisive, and loyal, unwilling to reject her child in favor of a comfortable life free of others’ judgments. Even though she initially fails to realize the extent of Grant’s goodness, she is obviously also wise when it comes to her romantic choices, selecting two men to share her life who are honorable and kind beyond the limits of their time. As the child of such a mother, it’s hard to imagine Lucy growing up to be anything other than exceptional.

                Some may see “The Yellow Face” as the relic of an age best forgotten, but I don’t believe Effie Munro or Lucy Hebron would approve. Sometimes, as readers, we open the pages of history and wade through context and bygone mores to find the diamonds hidden in plain sight among the things that we’d rather not remember.

                Effie and her daughter are the creations of a man who operated within the confines of his time and society but also used his pen to joyfully and explosively break those confines wide open to present two women who deserve to be known and understood for years to come. May they never be forgotten in favor of stories we find easier to read.

               

thehobbitmovie:

What’s your favorite Bilbo moment? Here’s our final character banner reveal featuring Martin Freeman from #TheHobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies!

thehobbitmovie:

What’s your favorite Bilbo moment? Here’s our final character banner reveal featuring Martin Freeman from #TheHobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies!

15 octobre 2014 ♥ 295 notes           Reblog    
reblogged from thehobbitmovie
#Sherlock : l’intégrale des saisons 1 à 3 (mis à jour)

Annoncé il y a quelques instants par France Télévisions sur leur page Facebook, un coffret contenant l’intégrale des saisons 1 à 3 de la série Sherlock sortira le 8 octobre.

Comme ce fut le cas pour l’intégrale des saisons 1 à 2 ou pour les coffrets individuels des saisons 2 et 3, le packaging français est la copie conforme de son homologue UK :

image



Voici un petit récapitulatif du contenu de ce coffret :

9 épisodes
6 DVD
VF, VO, sous-titres VF
Bonus Saison 2 :
Episodes 1 et 2 en version commentée
Sherlock Uncovered (making-off)
Bonus Saison 3 :
The Fall (making-off)
Fans, Villains & Speculation: The Legacy of Sherlock Holmes (making-off)
Shooting Sherlock (making-off)



Commander le coffret DVD sur Amazon FR
Commander le coffret Blu-Ray sur Amazon FR



Pour toutes questions sur la série, n’hésitez pas à nous envoyer un mail à contact[at]bbcsherlockfrance.com.

thehobbitmovie:

Here’s the exclusive new poster for #TheHobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies!Who do you want to see next - Thorin or Gandalf? Comment below with your vote.

thehobbitmovie:

Here’s the exclusive new poster for #TheHobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies!

Who do you want to see next - Thorin or Gandalf? Comment below with your vote.

mxpublishing:

Hound of The Baskervilles Graphic Novel - Kickstarter.

mxpublishing:

Hound of The Baskervilles Graphic Novel - Kickstarter.

5 octobre 2014 ♥ 2 notes           Reblog    
reblogged from mxpublishing
Sherlock Holmes : le film de 1916 retrouvé à la Cinémathèque française !

On vous l’annonçait hier sur notre page Twitter, un Sherlock Holmes de 1916, que l’on croyait jusqu’à présent perdu pour toujours, a été retrouvé dans les archives de la Cinémathèque Française.

Voici l’article concernant cette exceptionnelle découverte :

Sherlock Holmes réalisé par Arthur Berthelet et produit par le studio américain Essanay en 1916 a été miraculeusement retrouvé il y a quelques semaines dans les collections films de la Cinémathèque française ! 

Considéré comme définitivement perdu depuis sa première exploitation, ce film représente une adaptation  majeure des aventures du héros de Sir Arthur Conan Doyle pour les holmésiens ou les sherlockians[1]. La mise en scène de Berthelet reprend la pièce américaine Sherlock Holmes de William Gillette (1853-1937), laquelle a connu un immense succès dans le monde entier entre 1899 et 1932. William Gillette était aussi un acteur de renom qui a incarné le détective sur scène pendant près de trente ans, et qui reprend son rôle dans cette adaptation cinématographique. Tout en étant la seule trace de la performance de l’acteur, ce film permet aussi de découvrir les créations apocryphes de celui-ci, qui semblent s’être inscrites presque naturellement dans la mémoire collective en devenant des archétypes holmésiens. En effet, Gillette a notamment ajouté des accessoires particuliers qui s’écartent des textes originaux comme la pipe courbée[2], ou bien une canne, qui furent repris dans des illustrations américaines d’époque[3], et que l’on retrouvera aussi dans des adaptations cinématographiques ultérieures. 

Matériel promotionnel d’époque

C’est aussi à lui que l’on doit la fameuse réplique « élémentaire, mon cher Watson ». Son adaptation théâtrale en 4 actes qui avait été relue et cosignée par Conan Doyle, entremêle plusieurs romans et nouvelles publiées par le grand écrivain : A Scandal in Bohemia (Un scandale en Bohême), The Final Problem (Le Problème final), A Study in Scarlet (Une Etude en rouge), The Sign of Four (Le Signe des Quatre), The Boscombe Valley Mystery (Le Mystère du Val Boscombe) et The Greek Interpreter (L’Interprète grec). Gillette écrira également en 1905 une seconde pièce intitulée The Painful Predicament of Sherlock Holmes mais qui ne sera pas intégrée dans le film d’Essanay. Le film, quant à lui, se présente sous forme de série comprenant quatre épisodes : Les Lettres du prince héritierMoriarty contre Sherlock Holmes, Une nuit tragiqueLe Triomphe de Sherlock Holmes.

Le projet de restauration du film

L’élément qui a été retrouvé à la Cinémathèque française est un contretype nitrate complet qui, à ce jour, s’avère être unique au monde. Originellement destiné à l’exploitation française, le contretype contient des intertitres français, et des annotations de teintes. Cette dernière particularité demeure surprenante car les films Essanay n’ont que très rarement été exploités en couleur sur le territoire américain. Il nous paraît dès lors plausible que la version en couleurs ait été créée spécialement pour la France. 
Le contretype est à l’heure actuelle en cours de restauration numérique par la Cinémathèque française et le San Francisco Silent Film Festival, organisation avec laquelle nous restaurons les films américains de nos collections depuis maintenant 2 ans. Cette restauration est également rendue possible grâce à la généreuse contribution d’individus, passionnés par Sherlock.

Photogrammes du film

La première européenne du film aura lieu à la Cinémathèque française dans le cadre du Festival Toute La Mémoire du Monde, qui débutera le 28 Janvier 2015. La première américaine sera, quant à elle, projetée au San Francisco Silent Film Festival courant Mai 2015. 



Céline Ruivo




Notes : 
[1] Les holmésiens, ou « holmesians », sont les personnes passionnées par tout ce qui a trait à Sherlock Holmes et qui veulent partager leur passion. Les sherlockians sont similaires mais ils sont plutôt américains. Des sociétés Sherlock Holmes se sont créées dans plusieurs pays, dont la SSHF en France : http://www.sshf.com
[2] Une pipe en écume de mer qui a elle même progressivement mué en Calebasse selon les adaptations filmiques ou visuelles, tandis que dans les romans, Sherlock fume plutôt des  pipes droites. 
[3] Notamment par l’illustrateur Frederic Dorr Steele contemporain de Gillette. Toutefois, on doit le chapeau anglais Deerstalker à Sidney Paget, premier illustrateur des romans de Conan Doyle.



Nous espérons avoir le grand plaisir de pouvoir assister à la projection française de ce film l’année prochaine et vous tiendrons bien entendu au courant de toutes informations se rapportant à cette projection.



La Team Sherlock France
Sherlock Holmes, Détective Consultant - Review
Titre : Sherlock Holmes, Détective Consultant
Auteur : John Bastardi Daumont
Editions : La Martinière
Paru le : 9 mai 2014
Nombre de pages : 206 pages



John Bastardi Daumont a longuement enquêté pour retracer la biographie du plus populaire des héros de fiction policière : il a parcouru l’Angleterre sur la piste de Sherlock Holmes, et trouvé de l’aide auprès des sociétés holmésiennes les plus célèbres.

Plus qu une simple biographie, cet ouvrage analyse la méthode holmésienne à l’aune des techniques scientifiques contemporaines. Le lecteur y apprend autant sur Sherlock Holmes que sur ses prototypes, ses rivaux, et son apport majeur dans l’univers policier.



Commander sur Amazon
Commander sur la Fnac



________________________________________



Voici donc notre review du livre Sherlock Holmes, Détective Consultant par John Bastardi Daumont.

Etant une grande lectrice, j’aime par dessus tout occuper mes vacances et autres moments libres avec un bon livre, et j’ai été agréablement surprise de voir que celui-ci était d’une grande facilité à dévorer…

Pour l’instant, nous vous avions surtout habitué à des reviews de films avec nos chers acteurs, car les regarder jouer ailleurs que dans Sherlock nous divertit beaucoup, mais revenir de temps en temps aux sources n’est pas un pêcher.

Revenons donc à ce livre, mais ne vous inquiétez pas, nous nous contenterons de quelques mots car nous n’avons pas l’intention de vous gâcher le plaisir de votre lecture en vous en dévoilant trop.

Ecrit comme une biographie de notre détective préféré, cet ouvrage retrace de manière ludique sa vie, de sa « naissance » à sa « retraite », en passant par son influence sur nos méthodes d’investigations d’aujourd’hui, sans oublier un coup d’oeil sur ses plus grands ennemis.

Si vous désirez parfaire vos connaissances sur ce personnage, ou simplement rafraichir votre mémoire sur certains aspects de sa « vie », ce livre est fait pour vous. Facile à lire, très bien documenté à l’aide de diverses photos et notes de bas de page, vous trouverez ici tout ce que vous avez besoin de savoir sur Sherlock Holmes en une brillante synthèse.

Si vous désirez lire d’autres reviews de livres sur Sherlock Holmes, ou si vous souhaiteriez nous faire connaitre le vôtre, n’hésitez pas à nous écrire à cette adresse pour nous soumettre vos suggestions, nous serions vraiment ravies de lire et poster quelques mots sur eux.



La Team Sherlock France
onceuponatee:

Head over to CompanionTees.com and get “Sherlock is my Holmesboy” by Tom Trager starting at only $12!http://companiontees.com/

onceuponatee:

Head over to CompanionTees.com and get “Sherlock is my Holmesboy” by Tom Trager starting at only $12!

http://companiontees.com/

Le coffret des saisons 1 à 3 en édition limité sort au Royaume-Uni
image

Comme promis, nous avons demandé à la BBC de nous tenir au courant si le coffret US dont nous vous avions parlé ici sortait au UK. Etant donné que nous étions dans l’obligation d’attendre que le Radio Times poste son article en premier, nous ne postons cette “bonne” nouvelle que maintenant.



Contenu exclusif du coffret édition limitée du BBC Shop :

- bêtisiers des saisons 2 et 3

- scène coupée exclusive de la saison 3

- commentaires des épisodes 1 et 3 par Una Stubbs, Mark Gatiss, Steven Moffat et Sue Vertue

- des interviews de Benedict Cumberbatch, Martin Freeman, Steven Moffat et Sue Vertue provenant des archives de la BBC et datant de la saison 1

- Unlocking Sherlock : 60min de coulisses sur la saison 3 (nouveauté)

- Sherlock Uncovered : 3x25min de featurettes, un pour chacun des 3 épisodes de la saison 3 (nouveauté)

- bustes collector de Sherlock et John

- 2 cartes postales en édition limitées



Pas de baisse de prix pour autant, le coffret coûte toujours environ 140€ :

Pré-commander le coffret édition limitée Blu-Ray + DVD sur le BBC Shop US



Mais ce n’est pas tout puisque la BBC a envoyé un petit apreçu de ces fameux “outtakes”, que vous pouvez voir sur le chaîne YouTube de Sherlockology :



La Team Sherlock France